©

(Source: nicolenelch, via truthmagic)

Being raised in an unstable household makes you understand that the world doesn’t exist to accommodate you, which… is something a lot of people struggle to understand well into their adulthood. It makes you realize how quickly a situation can shift, how danger really is everywhere. But crises when they occur, do not catch you off guard; you have never believed you lived under a shelter of some essential benevolence. And an unstable childhood makes you appreciate calmness and not crave excitement.
by Curtis Sittenfeld   (via wildbayou)

(Source: onlinecounsellingcollege, via wildbayou)

arabellesicardi:

immigrantgirls:

Hi! So i literally just finished creating/editing this sloppy zine i titled “Mantras”. It’s a twelve page zine made up of scans and words and things that are very important to me. i wanted to make it way longer but lmao what is the point when i share practically everything on this blog?! I just wanted to do this for me, i guess to lay it out there. So much shit has gone down in the last 3-4yrs and i marvel at how i am still bursting at the seams with so much hope and faith and love for the world and myself. This zine is a culmination of how i got myself thru/still getting myself thru things and also things that i love and things that make me happy, mostly Stevie Nicks. I hope i don’t come off as someone who has her shit together, most of this zine is me yelling at myself and it’s really difficult to follow the directions that i give to myself, like “TAKE WHAT’S YOURS” and “DON’T HIDE!” it’s very difficult and on most days i don’t follow these directions and i fail completely. But i still yell at myself because it’s necessary that i always have these things etched in me so i have something to hold on to when shit hits the fan. 
here’s a link for it, you can download if u wanna lmao rly hope u can read my handwriting
i also put it on issuu just for the hell of it

i see me in u and u in me, u are my own and i am proud of this and feel honored 2 have read it

annmuddy:

lots of cool drawings for cheap on my etsy~

enter the code “JUSTFORYOU” at checkout and get 20% off your entire order WOW

intergalactic-spacequeen:

i’m imagining that this is them buying munchies before a smoke session and it makes me so happyyyyy

(Source: youtube.com, via wildbayou)

qelle:

pre-homecoming 1991
"freshman year of high school. my date was mike dear, who was put in prison a couple of years later for attempting to stab his mother.
"my dress was from 5-7-9 at genesee valley mall."

someone from 1997 wished me good luck. it’s like someone from so many years back knows your struggles and i just, i think i’m gonna cry

If you’re poor, the only way you’re likely to injure someone is the old traditional way: artisanal violence, we could call it – by hands, by knife, by club, or maybe modern hands-on violence, by gun or by car.

But if you’re tremendously wealthy, you can practice industrial-scale violence without any manual labor on your own part. You can, say, build a sweatshop factory that will collapse in Bangladesh and kill more people than any hands-on mass murderer ever did, or you can calculate risk and benefit about putting poisons or unsafe machines into the world, as manufacturers do every day. If you’re the leader of a country, you can declare war and kill by the hundreds of thousands or millions. And the nuclear superpowers – the US and Russia – still hold the option of destroying quite a lot of life on Earth.

So do the carbon barons. But when we talk about violence, we almost always talk about violence from below, not above.


by Let’s Call Climate Change What It Really Is—Violence | Alternet (via guerrillamamamedicine)

(via llleighsmith)

hydeordie:

Miranda July Somebody 2014

Messaging app as inclusive performance art?

Poverty is not simply having no money — it is isolation, vulnerability, humiliation and mistrust. It is not being able to differentiate between employers and exploiters and abusers. It is contempt for the simplistic illusion of meritocracy — the idea that what we get is what we work for. It is knowing that your mother, with her arthritic joints and her maddening insomnia and her post-traumatic stress disordered heart, goes to work until two in the morning waiting tables for less than minimum wage, or pushes a janitor’s cart and cleans the shit-filled toilets of polished professionals. It is entering a room full of people and seeing not only individual people, but violent systems and stark divisions. It is the violence of untreated mental illness exacerbated by the fact that reality, from some vantage points, really does resemble a psychotic nightmare. It is the violence of abuse and assault which is ignored or minimized by police officers, social services, and courts of law. Poverty is conflict. And for poor kids lucky enough to have the chance to “move up,” it is the conflict between remaining oppressed or collaborating with the oppressor.
by Megan Lee (via queerintersectional)

(via llleighsmith)

sorryexcuseforsorry:

THE IMPORTANCE OF EACH OTHER (2014)

(Source: amypoehler, via lyceck)

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Police brutality in Ferguson costs taxpayers millions.

(via vvaterling)